Ang Muay Thai ni Homer

Ako’y masayadong na curious sa Muay Thai dahil sa Friend ko na si Homer na masyado ang pag karir sa sports na ito. Wala naman akong nababalitaan na mag kakaroon ng part 2 ang movie nuong 2003 na BEAUTIFUL BOXER tungkol sa buhay ni Nong Toom. Well eto ngayun at nag research ako sa Wikipidia para malaman ko ang Sprots na ito.

Muay Thai also known as Thai Boxing syempre sa Thailand nag originate ang sports na ito. Sabi nga it is also known as The Art of the Eight Limbs yan daw ang katawagan ng mga Thai sa hard martial art. Hinde lamang sa Thailang sikat ang martial arts na ito kundi sa IBANG SOUTHEAST ASIAN Contries.Syempre kasama ang Pinas dyan.. Sa martial arts na ito masyadong gamit ang hands, shins, elbows, and knees. Sabi pa sa wikipedia “A master practitioner of Muay Thai thus has the ability to execute strikes using eight “points of contact,” as opposed to “two points” (fists) in Western boxing and “four points” (fists, feet) used in the primarily sport-oriented forms of martial arts”.
Eto ang mga Muay Thai techniques
Muay Thai consisted of an arsenal of nine weapons – the head, fists, elbows, knees and feet – known collectively as na-wa arwud. Although in modern Muay Thai, both amateur and professional, headbutting an opponent is no longer allowed. Muay Thai is unique in the way it uses all parts of the body, including the elbows and knees, for both training and competitions.Formal Muay Thai techniques are divided into two groups: Mae Mai or major techniques and Luk Mai or minor techniques.

Punching techniques (Chok)
The punch techniques in Muay Thai were originally quite simple being crosses and a long (or lazy) circular strike made with a straight (but not locked) arm and landing with the heel of the palm. Muay Thai judges score punching techniques less highly than other strikes as they are generally less powerful than knee strikes or kicks and the fists are padded by gloves (while knees, elbows, shins, and feet are not).
As a tactic, body punching is used less in Muay Thai than most other striking martial arts to avoid exposing the attacker’s head to counter strikes from knees or elbows. Elbow techniques (dhee sork)can be used in seven ways: horizontal, diagonal-upwards, diagonal-downwards, uppercut, downward, backward-spinning and flying. From the side it can be used as either a finishing move or as a way to cut the opponent’s eyebrow so that blood might block his vision. This is the most common way of using the elbow. The diagonal elbows are faster than the other forms, but are less powerful. The uppercut and flying elbows are the most powerful, but are slower and easier to avoid or block. The downward elbow is usually used as a finishing move.
The single elbow is an elbow move independent from any other move, whereas a follow-up elbow is the second strike from the same arm, being a hook first with an elbow follow-up. Such elbows, and most other elbows, are used when the distance between fighters becomes too small and there is too little space to throw a hook at the opponent’s head.

Kicking techniques (dhe)
The two most common kicks in Muay Thai are known as the teep (literally “foot jab,”), and the TAE(kick)chieng (kicking upwards in the shape of a triangle cutting under the arm and ribs) or angle kick.

Muay Thai also includes other varieties of kicking, such as the axe kick, side kick or spinning back kick etc.

Knee techniques (dhee kao
• Kao Dode (Jumping knee strike) – the Thai boxer jumps up on one leg and strikes with that leg’s knee.
• Kao Loi (Flying knee strike) – the Thai boxer takes step(s), jumps forward and off one leg and strikes with that leg’s knee.
• Kao Tone (Straight knee strike) – the Thai boxer simply thrusts it forward (not upwards, unless he is holding an opponents head down in a clinch and intend to knee upwards into the face).
• Kao Noi (Small knee strike) – the Thai boxer hits the inside upper thigh (above the knee) of the opponent when clinching. This technique is used to wear down the opponent or to counter the opponent’s knee strike or kick.

Foot-thrust techniques (teep)

Foot-Thrusts also known as Push Kicks or literally “foot jabs” are one of the most common techniques used in Muay Thai. Teeps are different from any other Muay Thai technique in terms of objective to use. Foot-thrusts are mainly used as an offensive technique to block opponent’s attacks, and get an opponent off balance. Foot-Thrusts should be thrown quickly but yet with enough force to knock an opponent off balance.

The clinch It is often in the clinch where knee and elbow techniques are used. The front clinch should be performed with the palm of one hand on the back of the other. There are three reasons why the fingers must not be intertwined.
1) In the ring fighters are wearing boxing gloves and cannot intertwine their fingers.
2) The Thai front clinch involves pressing the head of the opponent downwards, which is easier if the hands are locked behind the back of the head instead of behind the neck. Furthermore the arms should be putting as much pressure on the neck as possible.
3) A fighter may incur an injury to one or more fingers they are intertwined, and it is harder to release the grip to quickly elbow the opponent’s head.

Muay Thai has several other variants of the clinch, including:
• arm clinch, where one or both hands controls the inside of the defender’s arm(s) and where the second hand if free is in the front clinch position, this clinch is used to briefly control the opponent before applying a knee strike or throw
• side clinch, one arm passing around the front of the defender with the attacker’s shoulder pressed into the defender’s arm pit and the other arm passing round the back which allows the attacker to apply knee strikes to the defender’s back or to throw the defender readily
• low clinch, with both controlling arms passing under the defender’s arms, which is generally used by the shorter of two opponents
• swan-neck where one hand around the rear of the neck is used to briefly clinch an opponent (before a strike).

Defenses in Muay Thai are categorised in 6 groups:
• Blocking – defender’s hard blocks to stop a strike in its path so preventing it reaching its target, (eg the Shin Block described in more detail below)
• Redirection – defender’s soft parries to change the direction of a strike (eg a downwards tap to a jab) so that it misses the target
• Avoidance – moving a body part out of the way or range of a strike so the defender remains in range for a counter-strike, eg defender moving the front leg backwards from the attacker’s low kick: then immediately counter-attacking with an angle kick: or defender laying the head back from the attacker’s high angle kick: then immediately counter-attacking with a side kick from the front leg:
• Evasion – moving the body out of the way or range of a strike so the defender has to move close again to counter-attack, eg defender jumping back from attacker’s kicks
• Disruption – Pre-empting an attack. eg with defender using disruptive techniques like jab, teep or low angle kick (to the inside of the attacker’s front leg) as the attacker attempts to close distance

Anticipation – Defender catching a strike (eg catching an angle kick to the body) or countering it before it lands (eg defender’s low kick to the supporting leg below as the attacker iniates a high angle kick).

The rules

Muay Thai is practiced in many different countries. There are different rules depending on what country the fight is in and under what organization the fight is arranged. These rules, however, are gathered from the rules section of the World Muay Thai Council’s web site. This is not the complete rulebook, but it contains a selection of the most important or most interesting rules. According to rule 8, section 2, the minimum weight to compete is 100 pounds (45 kg).

Boxing gloves
Category Weight (up to) Junior Middleweight and upwards 10 ounce (280 grams)
Featherweight – Welterweight 8 ounce (230 grams)
Mini Flyweight – Junior Featherweight 4 ounce (130 grams)

Eto at meron pa silang Dress code hehe baka naman me long gown competition pa dito
Dress Code

A. BOXER’S ATTIRE

5.1. Only boxing shorts are to be worn, the colour of which depending on the corner; red, pink, or maroon or with a red stripe for the red corner; blue, bright blue, black for the blue corner. The dressing gown will be as specified by the World Muay Thai Council.

5.2. To ensure the boxer’s safety, a groin protector must be worn and tied only at the back.

5.3. Long hair and/or beards are prohibited. A short mustache is allowed but the hair must not extend over the lip.

5.4. The Mongkol should be worn when performing the Wai Kru (paying respect to one’s teacher), prior to the match start. Amulets are only to be worn on the arm or waist and covered by material to avoid injury.

5.5. Single elastic bandages are allowed to be worn on the arm or legs to prevent sprains, however insertion of a shin guard, etc, is not allowed.

5.6. No metalized material, decoration or jewelery are allowed to be worn.

5.7. The use of Vaseline, fat or any similar substance by the boxer to gain unfair advantage is not allowed.

5.8. Boxer may wear elastic ankle bandages to protect his feet.

B. Any infringement to the dress code may result in the fighter’s disqualification. In the case of any problem with the boxing gloves themselves, the referee may temporarily halt the match until they are corrected.

Wai kru, ram muay and round definition Prior to the start of the first round, both fighters shall perform the Wai Kru (paying respect to the teacher[citation needed]), and Ram Muay (boxing dance[citation needed]), accompanied by the appropriate Thai traditional music, incorporating the Ching (cymbal[citation needed]), Klong khaek (tom-tom[citation needed]) and pi Java (Thai reed pipe). A Muay Thai match shall consist of five rounds, 3 minutes per round with a 2 minute break between each round.[citation needed] Any stoppage during the match for any reason, will not be counted as part of the 3 minute round time.[citation needed]

Scoring
The standard scoring practice is as follows :

A: A strike either by a punch, kick, knee or elbow.

1. Scoring from a strike:

1.1. Points will be awarded for a correct Thai Boxing style, combined with hard and accurate strikes.

1.2. Points will be awarded for aggressive and dominating Muay Thai skill.

1.3. Points will be awarded for a fighter actively dominating his opponent.

1.4. Points will be awarded for the use of a traditional Thai style of defense and counter-attack.

1.5. Points will be deducted from a boxer who fouls or breaks the rules.

2. Non scoring strikes:

2.1. A strike which is against the rules.

2.2. A strike in defense against the leg or arm of an opponent.

2.3. A weak strike.

B. Fouls.

1. The judges will deduct points for any foul as directed by the referee.

2. Any foul observed by the judges but not by the referee, will be penalized accordingly.

C. Method Of Scoring

1. The maximum score for each round is 10 points, the loser scoring either 9, 8 or 7.

2. A drawn round will be scored as 10 points for both boxers.

3. The winner and loser in an indecisive round, will score 10:9 respectively.

4. The winner and loser in a decisive round will score 10:8 respectively.

5. The winner and loser in an indecisive round with a single count, will score 10:8 respectively.

6. The winner and loser in a decisive round with a single count, will score 10:7 respectively.

7. The boxer scoring 2 counts against his opponent will score 10:7.

8. Any boxer who commits a foul will have points deducted from his score.

Fouls
18.1. Biting, eye gouging, spitting, or head butting.

18.2. Wrestling, back or arm locks or any similar judo or wrestling hold.

18.3. Deliberately falling on his opponent.

18.4. Holding the ropes for any reason.

18.5. Swearing or the use of abusive language during the match.

18.6. Knocking out or injuring his opponent after the referee has ordered the match to stop for any reason.

18.7. Deliberately striking the groin area.

To be penalized by the deduction of 1 point for each time committed.

A boxer who has been hit in the groin may request a 5 minute break before continuing the match.

Medical Inspection
22.1 All boxers will be certified by the doctor prior to the start of any fight and must not be suffering from any sickness or exhibit any prohibited symptom or disease, as specified in the medical manual of the Council.

22.2 Any boxer due to fight in a foreign country, will be physically examined by a doctor appointed by the Council Committee. He must also conform to the medical regulations of that country.

Procedure After Knock Out or Technical Knock Out

23.1 If a boxer is knocked unconscious or injured, only the doctor and the referee are allowed in the ring. Any others may only enter at the doctor’s discretion.

23.2 A boxer losing by a K.O. or T.K.O. will be immediately treated and undergo a physical examination by the doctor.

23.3 Recovery Period – After a match, a boxer is required to rest for a minimum of 21 days prior to fighting again, with the following exceptions:

23.3.1. A winner in the first round is required to rest a minimum of 7 days prior to his next fight.

23.3.2. The winner in the third round is required to rest a minimum of 14 days prior to his next fight.

23.3.3. A boxer losing by T.K.O. or K.O. must rest for a minimum of 30 days prior to his next fight.

23.3.4. A boxer specified under Items 23.3.1 – 23.3.3, must be examined by the doctor at the end of each fight, who will then specify his rest period.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muay_Thai

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